Restore Illinois

Illinois Community Recovery Order

On Friday, June 26th, each region in the state entered Phase 4 of the plan.

On Monday, July 21st, Mayor Lightfoot announcements the reinstatement of certain restrictions in Chicago which are effective starting Friday, July 24th. Please review the “Reopening Illinois & Chicago” section of our FAQ page.

On May 5th, Governor Pritzker released Restore Illinois, a five-phased plan that will reopen our state, guided by health metrics and with distinct business, education, and recreation activities characterizing each phase.

Click here to see the detailed 5-step Restore Illinois plan that included a public health approach to safely reopen Illinois.

Visit the Illinois Department of Public Health’s website for the most up to date information about Restore Illinois and answers to some commonly asked questions about COVID-19.

 

What is the plan to reopen Illinois?

Gov. JB Pritzker outlined a 5-step Restore Illinois plan that included a public health approach to safely reopen Illinois. The phases are as follow:

  1. Phase 1: Rapid Spread
  2. Phase 2: Flattening
  3. Phase 3: Recovery (effective May 29, 2020)
  4. Phase 4: Revitalization (effective June 26, 2020)
  5. Phase 5: Illinois Restored

This plan is guided by health metrics and with distinct business, education, and recreation activities characterizing each phase. This is an initial framework that will likely be updated as research and science develop and as the potential for treatments or vaccines is realized.

Does this order apply to the whole State of Illinois?

Yes, it is applicable to the entire State. However, local municipalities can use their discretion based on current date for their areas.

What are the modifications of the new executive order?

Gatherings of 10 people or fewer for any reason can resume. Select industries can begin returning to workplaces with social distancing and sanitization practices in place. Retail establishments can reopen with limited capacity. Select categories of personal care establishments can also begin to reopen with social distancing guidelines and PPE.

Phase Three: What can I do? What’s open?

  • All gatherings of 10 people or fewer are allowed with this limit subject to change based on latest data & guidance.
  • Travel should follow IDPH and CDC approved guidance.
  • All health care providers are open with DPH approved safety guidance.
  • Remote learning in P-12 schools and higher education.
  • Limited child care and summer programs are open with IDPH approved safety guidance.
  • State parks are open. Activities are permitted in groups of 10 or fewer with social distancing.
  • Employees of non-essential businesses are allowed to return to work with IDPH approved safety guidance depending upon risk level, telework strongly encouraged wherever possible. Employers are encouraged to provide accommodations for COVID-19 vulnerable employees.
  • Bars and restaurants are open for delivery, pick-up, drive-thru, and may permit outdoor food and beverage consumption on-premises when permitted by local ordinances and regulation and in accordance with DCEO guidance.
  • Barbershops and salons are open with IDPH approved safety guidance.
  • Health and fitness clubs can provide outdoor classes in groups no larger than 10 with social distancing and one-on-one personal training with IDPH approved safety guidance.
  • Retail businesses are open with capacity limits and IDPH approved safety guidance, including face coverings.

Within this plan, there are four Restore Illinois Health Regions. All counties in the Third District (Cook, Will, and DuPage) are in the Northeast Region. Governor Pritzker announced that Illinois entered Phase 3 on May 29th, 2020.

Phase 3 is the Recovery Phase, in which the rate among those surveillance tested is stable or declining. COVID-19-related hospitalizations and ICU capacity remains stable or is decreasing. Face coverings in public continue to be required. Gatherings of 10 people or fewer can resume. Select industries can begin returning to workplaces with social distancing and sanitization practices in place. Retail establishments reopen with limited capacity and select categories of personal care establishments can also begin to reopen with social distancing guidelines and PPE. Robust testing is available along with contact tracing to limit spread and closely monitor the trend of cases.

For additional information on moving to Phase 4, Revitalization, and what would cause us to move back, please refer to Governor Pritzker’s full Restore Illinois plan here.

 

What is the plan to reopen Chicago?

On May 8, 2020, Mayor Lori Lightfoot, alongside the Chicago Department of Public Health, announced the “Protecting Chicago” framework. The City of Chicago will be using this framework to guide Chicago’s reopening process. The framework has five phases:

  1. Phase 1: Strict Stay-at-Home
  2. Phase 2: Stay-at-Home
  3. Phase 3: Cautiously Reopen (effective June 3, 2020)
  4. Phase 4: Gradually Resume
  5. Phase 5: Protect

Chicago is in Phase 3, Cautiously Reopen as of June 3, 2020. Strict social distancing with some businesses open will occur. The goal is to thoughtfully begin to reopen Chicago safely. Non-essential workers begin to return to work in a phased way.

Select businesses, non-profits, city entities open with demonstrated, appropriate protections for workers and customers. When meeting others, individuals should physically distance and wear a face covering. Non-business, social gatherings are limited to less than 10 persons. Phased, limited public amenities will begin to open and people should stay at home if feeling ill or have come into contact with someone with COVID-19. People should continue to physically distance from vulnerable populations and get tested if they have symptoms.

The City of Chicago is monitoring answers to four questions in order to help determine when and how the transition between phases will take place:

  1. Is the rate of disease spread across the city and surrounding counties decreasing?
  2. Does the city have the testing and contact-tracing capacity to track the disease and limit spread?
  3. Are there enough support systems in place for vulnerable residents?
  4. Can the healthcare system handle a potential future surge (including beds, ventilators, and PPE)?

The full release on this plan can be found here. For additional information on “Protecting Chicago,” including information on guidelines to ensure employee safety and epidemiological markers as to where the city is in Phase 3 currently, please visit here.

Visit the Illinois Department of Public Health’s website for the most up to date information about Restore Illinois and answers to some commonly asked questions about COVID-19.

 

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